Latest Environmental Reporting

State removes roadblock to northwest Montana mines

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality has asked a judge to dismiss its 'bad actor' case against the CEO of Hecla Mining Co., which is trying to develop two copper and silver mines in Lincoln County.

The Montana Department of Environmental Quality has asked a judge to dismiss its ‘bad actor’ case against the CEO of Hecla Mining Co., which is trying to develop two copper and silver mines in Lincoln County.

MTFP launches MT Fire Report

As fire season progresses, Montana Free Press staff will update this page hourly with information on the location and size of fires reported across the state, as well air quality ratings for Montana communities with monitoring stations.

With an expansive drought drying out vegetation across the state, 2021 is shaping up to be a particularly active year for Montana wildfires. MTFP’s new Fire Report has information on the location and size of fires reported across the state, as well air quality ratings for Montana communities with monitoring stations, updated hourly.

Missouri River tributary runs dry after restoration project

The Forest Service says Beaver Creek needs time, runoff and precipitation to restore flow.

Helena anglers are anxious about the loss of surface flow to Beaver Creek, an important tributary of the Missouri River for spawning trout, after restoration work on the stream. The Forest Service says the improvements just need time to take hold.

MORE ENVIRONMENTAL COVERAGE

The Crazy Mountains’ next act

With a heliskiing operation looking for a foothold and the rumored sale of one of the largest ranches in the range, Montanans are wondering what’s next for this isolated and iconic landscape.

Hecla forging ahead with northwest Montana mines

Officials with an Idaho-based mining company developing two large copper and silver mines in Northwest Montana said they are undeterred by a recent ruling that could let the state label its CEO a “bad actor” because of a failed mine clean-up more than two decades ago in a different part of the state.

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MORE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING

Whose Crazies are they?

How the Crazy Mountains became ground zero in Montana’s most vexing land-use debate.

What’s next for water quality?

Montana is positioned to become the first state to strike numeric standards for nitrogen and phosphorus — just six years after becoming the first state to adopt them. How Montana will enforce water quality instead isn’t yet clear.

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