On the ballot

National groups fuel political blitz

With the contest between incumbent U.S. Sen. Steve Daines and term-limited Gov. Steve Bullock among the country’s closest U.S. Senate races, political dollars have surged into the race from around the nation, funding the steady barrage of mailers and political advertisements now pelting Montana voters.

Watching the insurers

In addition to serving on the five-member state Land Board, Montana’s state auditor is responsible for regulating insurance and securities in Montana.

The rematch for OPI

Montanans have ringside seats to a sequel match-up between two educators — one an incumbent with a widely known political identity, the other a determined challenger resolved to oust a past-and-present rival. Both have crafted positive messages about fighting for students, for teachers and for the sanctity of classrooms across the state. Yet they’re never far from ducking in and leveling a blow.

Shared State Podcast

Shared State

In Ep. 9 — 'For this and future generations'

John Adams tracks how influence, corruption and money have shaped Montana, from the Copper Kings to the Disclose Act to the ad YouTube just showed you.

Shared State

Ep. 8 — To secure the blessings of liberty

Shared State

Ep. 7 — Equality of opportunity

Shared State

Ep. 6 — Desiring to improve the quality of life

More Shared State


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MORE ELECTIONS COVERAGE

The Trump and COVID show

The advertisements have argued endlessly about who’s been a better steward of the state’s public lands, who is more beholden to special interests, who walks in blind lockstep with party leadership and which candidate would help gut or save health care. But what is more likely to sway the election in the closing weeks is Trump’s level of support in Montana and the status of the state’s coronavirus outbreak.



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MORE ELECTIONS HEADLINES

Drugs, health care and budgets

Montana’s next attorney general will be in the driver’s seat for influential legal fights, addressing the state’s ongoing drug and alcohol use issues and helping local officials handle crime. Depending on the November outcome of the race between Republican Austin Knudsen and Democrat Raph Graybill, the philosophy and priorities of Montana’s next attorney general could be dramatically different.

The statesman and the mogul

You’d be hard-pressed to identify prominent Montanans with more different resumes than the two major party candidates hoping to be elected Montana’s next governor this fall, succeeding term-limited Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock.

Who has the cure for health care?

While the two candidates’ paths would seem to converge at the same distant peak, where adequate health care is accessible and affordable for all Montanans, their distinct routes are largely defined by the point at which they diverge: the Affordable Care Act.

Not just weed

Montanans are effectively voting on two changes to state policy: whether local governments can pass gun laws, and the legalization of adult-use marijuana.

Six candidates vie for three Public Service Commission seats

Voters in districts around Missoula, Billings and Bozeman will have the chance this fall to select new leadership for the Montana Public Service Commission, the regulatory body at the center of the state’s energy politics, and an agency that has been rocked over the past year by a series of scandals.

Anti-marijuana group files dark money complaint

An anti-marijuana activist filed a complaint Thursday with the Montana Commissioner of Political Practices demanding that a group called North Fund — which has given nearly $5 million to recreational marijuana initiative promoter New Approach Montana — be required to disclose its donors.

Court shoots down GOP effort to block all-mail election option

U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen on Wednesday rejected a lawsuit brought by Republican groups seeking to halt mail-in voting during Montana’s November election, calling the plaintiffs’ claims that voting by mail would lead to widespread fraud “a fiction.”

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